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  • Treatment strategies based on recent evidence and best practices will be demonstrated, allowing the attendee to effectively integrate the information into a post-operative rehabilitation program. The presenters will also share evidence to support the use of manual treatment techniques to address concomitant pathological conditions (joint mobility, spinal alignment, myofascial pain) associated with shoulder dysfunction.

    Abstract:
    Treatment strategies based on recent evidence and best practices will be demonstrated, allowing the attendee to effectively integrate the information into a post-operative rehabilitation program. The presenters will also share evidence to support the use of manual treatment techniques to address concomitant pathological conditions (joint mobility, spinal alignment, myofascial pain) associated with shoulder dysfunction.

    Objectives:

    • Participants will be able to based on the available evidence, develop a non-operative rehabilitation program for patients with SLAP lesions., 
    • Participants will be able to explain best practices for the clinical evaluation of athletes with a SLAP lesion., 
    • Participants will be able to interpret results of clinical and diagnostic testing, and explain the common surgical procedures utilized., 
    • Participants will be able to develop an appropriate post-operative rehabilitation program based upon the available evidence.

    Level:
    Essential

    Domains:
    Domain 2: Assessment Evaluation and Diagnosis
    Domain 4: Therapeutic Intervention

    CEUs:
    1.75 Category A

    Keywords: Superior labral anterior posterior, shoulder, rehabilitation, SLAP lesion, treatment

    James Onate, PhD, ATC, FNATA

    Dr. Jimmy Onate joined The Ohio State University in January 2010. He earned his PhD in Human Movement Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2002 with a focus in biomechanics and motor learning. He has been an academic research faculty member interested in all aspects of human movement relative to injury prevention and performance optimization since 2003. He currently serves as the director of the PhD program in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, chair of graduate studies in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, a co-director of Ohio State's Sports Medicine's Movement Analysis & Performance (MAP) research program, a research scholar for the National Federation of High School Sports Medicine Advisory Committee, and a research consultant to Naval Special Warfare groups based in Virginia Beach, VA.His main research focus lies in developing functional motion assessment research that bridges the gap across research to clinical systems to allow for evidence-based outcomes for aiding individuals to sustain optimal health and performance throughout their careers and lives.

    Research Focus

    The specific aims of his research are focused to answer specific issues related to lower extremity injury, in particular anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, pre-participation examinations and human performance optimization. Funding for his work has been provided through the National Institutes of Health, Office of Naval Research, United States Special Operations Command and Naval Special Warfare Development Group for evaluating lower extremity injury in collegiate athletes and the development of physical performance models in military soldiers. The interaction of these two areas initially seems distinct, yet his approach to the questions lies along the fundamental concept of creating a parsimonious screening approach for evaluating injury risk and performance enhancement for physically active individuals, utilizing the movement assessment information to develop an instructional feedback approach to enhance performance and prevent injury and to integrate these two approaches into an implementable scientific model-driven approach to aid physically active individuals throughout their careers and lifetime to optimize health and performance. Dr. Onate acts as a key component in building the bridges between exercise and performance areas relative to all aspects of personalized health care in the hopes of developing proactive integrative approaches for wellness-based medicine aimed at optimizing lifelong health and performance.

  • There are over 100 different physical examination tests described to evaluate the shoulder. Confusion exists with regard to not only the proper technique but the validity of commonly used tests. In today's fast paced environment evidence based accuracy and efficiency when examining athletes is very important. This presentation will review the proper technique and statistical validation, and relevance of the best tests based on current literature. The discussion will include a demonstration of an efficient sequence and algorithm incorporating all necessary tests to complete a thorough and comprehensive examination of the shoulder.

    Abstract:
    There are over 100 different physical examination tests described to evaluate the shoulder. Confusion exists with regard to not only the proper technique but the validity of commonly used tests. In today's fast paced environment evidence based accuracy and efficiency when examining athletes is very important. This presentation will review the proper technique and statistical validation, and relevance of the best tests based on current literature. The discussion will include a demonstration of an efficient sequence and algorithm incorporating all necessary tests to complete a thorough and comprehensive examination of the shoulder.

    Objectives:

    • Participants will be able to describe the history and proper indications for the most commonly used shoulder exam tests., 
    • Participants will be able to explain basic statistical terms (i.e., sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy) to describe the validity of physical exam tests., 
    • Participants will be able to describe the proper technique for performing shoulder exam tests.


    Level:

    Advanced

    Domains:

    Domain 2: Assessment Evaluation and Diagnosis

    CEUs:
    0.75 Category A

    Keywords: shoulder, examination, tests, diagnostic, pitching, throwing,

    Steve Jordan, MD

    Dr. Steve Jordan is a board certified, fellowship trained orthopaedic surgeon. Dr. Jordan earned his Medical Degree from Medical University of South Carolina. Dr. Jordan specializes in sports medicine; however, he takes a special interest in shoulder injuries, throwing injuries, ACL reconstruction, and Tommy John reconstruction. Dr. Jordan is the Team Physician for both Washington High School and Chipola College.

  • History of prior injury is the strongest risk factor for future lower extremity injury. In addition, a large portion of secondary injuries occur during the first 2-3 months following return to sport. Thus, there is a gap in determining when an individual is ready to safely return to sport following initial injury. Individuals who pass a comprehensive return to sport testing battery are at lower risk for subsequent injury once returning to sport. As such, the development and utilization of a comprehensive return-to-sport testing battery can help determine one´s readiness to safely return to sport. This presentation will discuss the key components of an evidence-based return to sport testing battery following lower extremity injuries.

    Presented at the 70th NATA CLINICAL SYMPOSIA & AT EXPO

    Abstract:
    History of prior injury is the strongest risk factor for future lower extremity injury. In addition, a large portion of secondary injuries occur during the first 2-3 months following return to sport. Thus, there is a gap in determining when an individual is ready to safely return to sport following initial injury. Individuals who pass a comprehensive return to sport testing battery are at lower risk for subsequent injury once returning to sport. As such, the development and utilization of a comprehensive return-to-sport testing battery can help determine one´s readiness to safely return to sport. This presentation will discuss the key components of an evidence-based return to sport testing battery following lower extremity injuries.

    Objectives:

    • Participants will be able to describe the changes in injury rates following initial lower extremity injury and subsequent return to sport., 
    • Participants will be able to describe the known risk factors for secondary injury following initial lower extremity injury., 
    • Participants will be able to utilize validated return to sport testing that can determine an individual´s readiness to return to sport., 
    • Participants will be able to discuss the role of training load monitoring and management in the return to sport process following lower extremity injury.

    Level:
    Advanced

    Domains:
    Domain 1: Risk Reduction Wellness and Health Literacy, Domain 2: Assessment Evaluation and Diagnosis

    CEUs: 1.0 Category A

    Keywords: knee, injury, lower extremity, return to sport, ankle, leg, testing

    Darin Padua, PhD, ATC

    Darin A. Padua is the Associate Provost for Academic Operations of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As an academic leader, he works to listen, collaborate, and empower others to work as a team towards our shared mission, vision, and priorities.

    The Joseph Curtis Sloane Distinguished Professor of Exercise and Sport Science, Padua has been a member of UNC’s faculty since 2001. He teaches courses in biomechanics, human anatomy, and kinesiology with a focus on injury risk mitigation and optimizing human performance. Throughout his career, Padua has mentored fellow faculty, along with hundreds of graduate and undergraduate students. He served as chair in the Department of Exercise and Sport Science from 2013 to 2023.

    With more than 25 years of experience, Padua is an internationally recognized scholar and is the Co-Director of the Musculoskeletal Injury Prevention (MOTION) Science Institute. His research revolves around prevention of musculoskeletal injuries, such as ACL rupture, by studying the role of movement quality and biomechanics as injury risk factors and intervention targets. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed articles, and his work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association, and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. He

    He received the Young Investigator Award by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (2006) and was later awarded the O’Donoghue Sports Injury Research Award for the most outstanding sport injury related research paper by the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (2008). He attained Fellow status in the National Academy of Kinesiology, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association, and received the Most Distinguished Athletic Trainer Award. His career research achievements were recognized by the by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association with receipt of the Medal for Distinguished Research (2017).

    Padua earned a B.S. in athletic training from San Diego State University, M.A. in exercise and sport science/athletic training from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and PhD in sports medicine from the University of Virginia. Born and raised in Visalia, California, he lives with his wife Jody and three daughters in Durham, NC.

  • Knee pathologies are common complaints for athletes and active patients presenting to athletic trainers for assessment and intervention, and though often not as complex as other joints in the body (ie, shoulder or hip), can present significant diagnostic challenges when imaging techniques are not readily or immediately available. Common traumatic disorders of the knee include forces that impact the menisci, ligaments, bones, and associated joints (ie, patellofemoral, tibiofemoral), while overuse injuries involving the patellofemoral joint, surrounding tissues (ie, IT Band), patellar tendon and tibiofemoral joint can challenge the unsuspecting diagnostician, as well. Undiagnosed, or improperly diagnosed knee conditions can also lead to lifelong disability and/or profound decreases in health-related quality of life and functional enjoyment. Unsuspecting or inexperienced clinicians in all branches of sports medicine, if not careful can naively rely on special test results in isolation, or upon medical imaging for a working or final diagnosis, which includes false positive and negative results, increases overall healthcare costs, and/or cause unnecessary delays in treatment or return to participation. Experts in medical research have confirmed that accurate diagnoses come from the history portion of the exam in over 80 to 90% of cases and that individual physical exam test results should be viewed with suspicion in isolation. The focus of this presentation is to present the athletic training profession a review of physical examination special tests for common knee injuries and conditions, while also introducing or reviewing the evidence behind each test's respective diagnostic accuracy. In so doing, an overview of diagnostic accuracy terms and principles will be presented, followed by available diagnostic accuracy dates for each test presented in order for clinicians to become more aware of the strengths and limitations of tests commonly used to help assess athletic injuries of the knee.

    Abstract:
    Knee pathologies are common complaints for athletes and active patients presenting to athletic trainers for assessment and intervention, and though often not as complex as other joints in the body (ie, shoulder or hip), can present significant diagnostic challenges when imaging techniques are not readily or immediately available. Common traumatic disorders of the knee include forces that impact the menisci, ligaments, bones, and associated joints (ie, patellofemoral, tibiofemoral), while overuse injuries involving the patellofemoral joint, surrounding tissues (ie, IT Band), patellar tendon and tibiofemoral joint can challenge the unsuspecting diagnostician, as well. Undiagnosed, or improperly diagnosed knee conditions can also lead to lifelong disability and/or profound decreases in health-related quality of life and functional enjoyment. Unsuspecting or inexperienced clinicians in all branches of sports medicine, if not careful can naively rely on special test results in isolation, or upon medical imaging for a working or final diagnosis, which includes false positive and negative results, increases overall healthcare costs, and/or cause unnecessary delays in treatment or return to participation. Experts in medical research have confirmed that accurate diagnoses come from the history portion of the exam in over 80 to 90% of cases and that individual physical exam test results should be viewed with suspicion in isolation. The focus of this presentation is to present the athletic training profession a review of physical examination special tests for common knee injuries and conditions, while also introducing or reviewing the evidence behind each test's respective diagnostic accuracy. In so doing, an overview of diagnostic accuracy terms and principles will be presented, followed by available diagnostic accuracy dates for each test presented in order for clinicians to become more aware of the strengths and limitations of tests commonly used to help assess athletic injuries of the knee.

    Objectives:

    • Participants will be able to state the fundamental principles and terms associated with diagnostic accuracy of physical examination tests, including sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, positive and negative predictive values, and overall utility scores., 
    • Participants will be able to identify the most useful, evidence-based physical examination tests for assessing various conditions of the knee., 
    • Participants will be able to recognize and incorporate the best-evidence tests in times of acute and chronic assessment of common knee injuries., 
    • Participants will be able to apply use of pooled tests in order to more accurately assess various orthopedic conditions of the knee in athletes and active patients.

    Level:
    Advanced

    Domains:
    Domain 2: Assessment Evaluation and Diagnosis

    CEUs:
    1.25 Category A

    Keywords: knee, orthopedic, menisci, ligaments, bones, joints, patellofemoral, tibiofemoral

    Paul Geisler, EdD, AT Ret.

    Associate Dean Geisler is a native of Lakeville, MA and current resident of Boston, MA. A certified athletic trainer since 1987 with over 15 years of varied clinical practice and 23 years' experience directing athletic training education programs at Georgia Southern University and Ithaca College. He is deeply interested in the development and assessment of the medico-clinical thinking processes of novice and experienced clinicians, the development of adaptive expertise in clinicians, progressive curriculum design, capability-based education, and meaningful programmatic assessment. He has over 170 national and international presentations and publications on clinical and educational based subjects in athletic training and health professions education to his credit. He is a member of the European Board of Medical Assessors, and past member of the Association of Medical Education, Europe.

    As a scholar, he is the recipient of two manuscript awards from the Journal of Athletic Training and the Athletic Training Education Journal. For his many professional contributions, he has been the recipient of the NATA Athletic Training Service Award and NATA Most Distinguished Athletic Trainer Award. As an educator, he was awarded the NATA Executive Council on Education's Sayers "Bud" Miller Distinguished Educator Award in 2021 and has received two Dean's Awards for Excellence & Innovation in Teaching, a Dean's Excellence Award for Diversity and Inclusion in Teaching and Learning, and the all college Faculty Excellence Award, all from Ithaca College.

    He admits to being an enthusiastic but slow road cyclist, an amateur shutterbug of nature and wonder, an aspiring wine snob and amateur foodie, and an unabashed promoter of equal rights, freedom, justice, and authentic democracy for all living beings. Susan, his life partner and wife of 34 years and he are fulfilled parents of two amazing young men – Nicholas, a writer living in Los Angeles, CA and Benjamin, a photographer and artist living in Brooklyn, NY.



    Series Content Where I am Featured:
    Master Preceptor Level Two - Module Five

  • The focus of this presentation is to present the most current clinical recognition strategies for evaluating ankle sprains and linking these strategies to the identification of those who are at the highest risk for developing CAI.

    Abstract:
    The focus of this presentation is to present the most current clinical recognition strategies for evaluating ankle sprains and linking these strategies to the identification of those who are at the highest risk for developing CAI.

    Objectives:

    • Participants will be able to summarize the recommendations of the NATA Position Statement on the Conservative Management and Prevention of Ankle Sprains in Athletes within the context of Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis., 
    • Participants will be able to identify the most important evidence-based key features associated with lateral ankle sprain recognition., 
    • Participants will be able to incorporate the emerging evidence of patient- and clinician-oriented outcome measures for identifying those at risk for developing chronic ankle instability., 
    • Participants will be able to make use of the outcome measures discussed in the presentation, including the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure, the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool, the weight-bearing lunge test, the single limb balance test, and the star excursion balance test, within their clinical practice.


    Level:
    Advanced

    Domains:
    Domain 2: Assessment Evaluation and Diagnosis

    CEUs:
    1.0 Category A

    Keywords: ankle, sprain, instability, diagnosis, lateral ankle sprain, balance test

    Patrick McKeon, PhD, ATC, CSCS

    Dr. Patrick McKeon is a BOC certified athletic trainer who joined the Ithaca College Athletic Training faculty in 2013. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Athletic Training from Springfield College in Springfield, MA;  his Master of Science degree in Sports Health Care from the Arizona School of Health Sciences in Phoenix, AZ (now in Mesa, AZ); and his PhD in Sports Medicine at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. He has held several positions as a clinical athletic trainer including Pearl River High School, Canisius College, and Marist College in New York, as well as Phoenix College and Brophy College Preparatory in Arizona.


    SCHOLARLY/RESEARCH INTERESTS

    Dr. McKeon’s research focuses on functional alterations associated with lower extremity joint injury. He incorporates patient-, clinician-, and laboratory-oriented outcomes to evaluate these alterations due to injury. Dr. McKeon also seeks to develop a greater understanding of the restoration of function associated with rehabilitation.  He aims to provide insight into effective clinical interventions for the sports medicine clinician to improve functional outcomes and enhance prevention strategies for patients who suffer lower extremity injury.  


    EDUCATIONAL INTERESTS

    Dr. McKeon's educational focus centers on evidence-based practice concepts and clinical reasoning theory. Within the courses he teaches, Dr. McKeon strives to instill a strong foundation in the integration of internal and external evidence for enhancing decisions related to the recognition, rehabilitation, and prevention of injuries/illnesses associated with athletic training clinical practice.


    PERSONAL

    Dr. McKeon enjoys spending his free time with his family and friends seeking out great life experiences. His wife, Dr. Jennifer McKeon is the IC Athletic Training Program Director and a faculty member in the Department of Exercise Science and Athletic Training. They have two children (Bobby and Mallory) who are also proud to be Bombers!



    Series Content Where I am Featured:
    Master Preceptor Level Two - Module Five