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  • With the NATA's recent commitment to DEIA, it is imperative for athletic trainers to be knowledgeable about ways to directly engage their current practice in an equitable way. The purpose of this presentation is to provide athletic trainers with background, knowledge, and action steps regarding ways to implement DEIA initiatives in their professional, social, and personal lives. This presentation will include historical perspectives regarding DEIA in the athletic training profession, current national initiatives and future action steps to challenge athletic trainers to take the next steps.


    Abstract:
    With the NATA's recent commitment to DEIA, it is imperative for athletic trainers to be knowledgeable about ways to directly engage their current practice in an equitable way. The purpose of this presentation is to provide athletic trainers with background, knowledge, and action steps regarding ways to implement DEIA initiatives in their professional, social, and personal lives. This presentation will include historical perspectives regarding DEIA in the athletic training profession, current national initiatives and future action steps to challenge athletic trainers to take the next steps.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify and explain the need for inclusive practices in the athletic training profession
    • Identify barriers to implementing DElA commitments to their current setting
    • Develop and apply DEIA initiatives and strategies to their current work setting

    Level:
    Advanced

    Domain(s):
    Domain 1: Risk Reduction Wellness and Health Literacy 
    Domain 5: Health Care Administration and Professional Responsibility

    CEUs:
    0.75 Category A

    Keywords: DEIA Commitments, diversity, equity, inclusion, accessibility

    Rebecca Lopez, PhD, LAT, ATC

    Dr. Rebecca M. Lopez is a Professor in the Athletic Training Program at the University of South Florida’s Morsani College of Medicine and a Fellow of NATA. Dr. Lopez is currently serving as an Assistant School Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in the School of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Sciences at USF. She also serves as Co-Chair of NATA’s DEIA Task Force. Through her leadership as a Co-Chair of this task force, she has been working to ensure the profession of athletic training continues to grow as health care providers by embracing diversity, cultivating an inclusive and welcoming environment, and reducing the health and health care disparities of underrepresented groups. 

    Research interests include exertional heat stroke and other exertional heat illnesses, cooling methods for hyperthermic athletes, ergogenic aids and thermoregulation, hydration and exercise performance, exercise heat tolerance issues with American football uniforms, sickle cell trait & the athlete, preventing sudden death in sport, return to activity following heat stroke, youth sports injury, and diversity, equity & inclusion in athletic training.

    Trevor M. Bates, DHSc, AT

    Dr. Bates holds a Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training from Millikin University, a Master of Science in Kinesiology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a Doctorate in Health Sciences from AT Still University of Health Sciences. His most recent tenure in academia includes serving as President of Wilmington College, as Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty at Mercy College of Ohio, and as Founding Associate Dean of Health Sciences at Heidelberg University. Outside of higher education, Dr. Bates served as Executive Vice President of Strategy and Innovation for True Empowering LLC.

    In addition to his professional achievements, Dr. Bates is actively engaged in various volunteer appointments in healthcare and has been recognized with numerous awards and honors, including the 2024 Outstanding Educator Award from the Great Lakes Athletic Trainers’ Association and the 2022 Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign - College of Applied Health Sciences. Dr. Bates is also currently the National Athletic Trainers' Association's DEIA Council Chair. 

  • Exertional heat stroke (EHS) is a medical emergency diagnosed when body core temperature is >40.5°C (105°F) and central nervous system dysfunction is displayed. The possibility of neurologic deterioration, organ failure, and death increases the longer body temperature remains above 40.5°C. The immediate treatment priority is to lower body core temperature as rapidly as possible--preferably within the first 30 minutes of collapse using cold-water immersion. While the above points are generally accepted, many myths and misconceptions remain about the best way to implement EHS best practices. This presentation will focus on several of these misconceptions and discuss the recent…


    Abstract:
    Exertional heat stroke (EHS) is a medical emergency diagnosed when body core temperature is >40.5°C (105°F) and central nervous system dysfunction is displayed.  The possibility of neurologic deterioration, organ failure, and death increases the longer body temperature remains above 40.5°C.  The immediate treatment priority is to lower body core temperature as rapidly as possible--preferably within the first 30 minutes of collapse using cold-water immersion. While the above points are generally accepted, many myths and misconceptions remain about the best way to implement EHS best practices.  This presentation will focus on several of these misconceptions and discuss the recent literature that debunks them so that clinicians can implement best practice for this life-threatening condition.


    Learning Objectives:

    • Defend the use of rectal thermometry to diagnose exertional heat stroke.
    • Explain why using just clinical signs and symptoms to diagnose exertional heat stroke can lead to poor clinical outcomes. 
    • Explore examples of cooling strategies that are consistent with excellent patient outcomes.

    Level:
    Essential

    Domain(s):
    Domain 2: Assessment Evaluation and Diagnosis 
    Domain 3: Critical Incident Management 

    CEUs:
    1.5 Category A

    Keywords: external heat stroke, heat illness, rectal temperature, cold water immersion, tarp assisted cooling, body bag cooling

    Kevin Miller, PhD, AT, ATC

    Dr. Kevin Miller is a Professor and Athletic Trainer in the Athletic Training Program at Texas State University. His research interests include the causes, treatments, and prevention of exertional heat illness with a specific emphasis on exercise-associated muscle cramping and exertional heat stroke in American football players.

    He has published over 65 peer-reviewed manuscripts in medical journals and presented over 100 international, national, or regional presentations on topics related to heat illness. He has Chaired and co-authored several national and international position statements including the 2021 NATA Roundtable on the Prehospital Care of Exertional Heatstroke, the 2015 NATA Position Statement on Exertional Heat Illness; the Statement of the Third International Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia Consensus Development Conference; and the NATA round table on Malignant Hyperthermia in Physically-Active Populations.

    He was the recipient of the 2019 MATS Distinguished Athletic Trainer Award, the 2022 GLATA Outstanding Educator Award, and the 2022 NATA Professional Development Excellence Award. Stories about his research have appeared in the New York Times, Men’s Health Journal, the BBC, and National Geographic, to name a few.

    He is a member of the Korey Stringer Institute’s Medical and Science Advisory Board; an Associate Editor for the Journal of Athletic Training; a member of the Editorial Boards for the Journal of Athletic Training; Exercise Physiology; Sport and Exercise Nutrition; and Athletic Training and Sports Health Care; and member of the NATA’s Convention Program Committee.

  • In the workplace and the community, Athletic Trainers have a unique opportunity to foster an environment which is inclusive, equitable and diverse. The ability to navigate the unconscious attitudes or stereotypes one may have can influence their decisions, actions, and understanding of the community they serve, and work alongside. Addressing implicit bias is vital to the workplace and can affect aspects of hiring, patient care, and practices. Creating and maintaining a practice which is equitable and culturally competent can be challenging for a practitioner. Research indicates a need for Athletic Trainers and Athletic Training Students to increase their cultural proficiency within…

    Abstract:
    In the workplace and the community, Athletic Trainers have a unique opportunity to foster an environment which is inclusive, equitable and diverse. The ability to navigate the unconscious attitudes or stereotypes one may have can influence their decisions, actions, and understanding of the community they serve, and work alongside. Addressing implicit bias is vital to the workplace and can affect aspects of hiring, patient care, and practices. Creating and maintaining a practice which is equitable and culturally competent can be challenging for a practitioner. Research indicates a need for Athletic Trainers and Athletic Training Students to increase their cultural proficiency within clinical practice.  Implicit bias education and strategies of mitigation should be included during structural and institutional policy changes as a method for achieving greater health equity and decrease the gap of those from marginalized communities.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Define and identify the difference between explicit and implicit biases.
    • Understand the causes of implicit bias; how they form and operate; and how media can influence societal norms to influence and perpetuate implicit biases.
    • Acknowledge and identify the potential harm and negative consequences of implicit biases in healthcare and the workplace. 
    • Explore strategies to recognize, interrupt and mitigate implicit bias. 

    Level:
    Essential

    Domain(s):
    Domain 5: Health Care Administration and Professional Responsibility

    CEUs:
    1.0 Category A

    Keywords: Inclusion, implicit bias, cultural awareness, DEIA, diversity, 

    Carlitta Moore, EdD, LAT, ATC

    Dr. Carlitta Moore serves in the role of the Clinical Education Coordinator/Assistant Professor for the Master of Athletic Training Program at Arkansas State University, as well as the Assistant Dean of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion for the College of Nursing and Health Professions. During her time at A-State, she has served as the current National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) Ethnic Diversity Advisory Committee (EDAC) District Six Representative, Chair of the Southwest Athletic Trainers’ Association (SWATA) EDAC and the past Chair/member of the Arkansas Athletic Trainers’ Association (AATA) Diversity and Inclusion Committee. At Arkansas State University, she is the Faculty Senate Vice President and President of the Black Faculty and Staff Association. Dr. Moore also on Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) Professional Programs Accreditation Council, and the American Association of Blacks in Higher Education (AABHE) Board of Directors.

    Previously Dr. Moore served as the Assistant Athletics Director for Sports Medicine and Head Athletic Trainer at Fayetteville State University, and was the first African-American female Head Athletic Trainer at Fayetteville State. Dr. Moore commits her service as a member of the Community Health Education Foundation (CHEF) in Jonesboro, AR, and a Diamond Life Member of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.

  • Every day, ATs face the potential of having to manage life-threatening situations. A critical component of providing emergency care is the administration of lifesaving medications. All ATs must be prepared to administer the small collection of lifesaving medications delineated in the 2020 CAATE standards. This preparation includes knowing the indications for, contraindications to, and procedures for administering each medication. Additionally, the AT needs to understand the details of patient monitoring for each drug and use clinical judgment to determine when 911 should be activated. It also involves ensuring that policies and procedures—consistent with state laws and regulations—are established…

    Abstract:
    Every day, ATs face the potential of having to manage life-threatening situations. A critical component of providing emergency care is the administration of lifesaving medications. All ATs must be prepared to administer the small collection of lifesaving medications delineated in the 2020 CAATE standards. This preparation includes knowing the indications for, contraindications to, and procedures for administering each medication. Additionally, the AT needs to understand the details of patient monitoring for each drug and use clinical judgment to determine when 911 should be activated. It also involves ensuring that policies and procedures—consistent with state laws and regulations—are established to help guide the AT in the administration of these medications   

    Learning Objectives:

    • Understand the emergency medications covered in the CAATE Standards
    • List and describe the emergency medications used by athletic trainers
    • Manage emergency situations with appropriate emergency medications

    Level:
    Essential

    Domain(s):
    Domain 3: Critical Incident Management 

    CEUs:
    1.0 Category A

    Keywords: emergency medications, rescue medications, emergency treatment, life saving medications, Narcan, overdose, naloxone, aspirin, albuterol, nitroglycerine, oxygen, glucose, epinephrine

    Mark Hoffman, PhD, ATC, EMT, FNATA

    Dr. Mark Hoffman, PhD, ATC, EMT, FNATA, is a professor at Oregon State University's College of Health.


    Academic interests

    Understanding and improving factors influencing the health, wellness, and safety of wildland firefighters.  More specifically, this work is currently focused on the medical services provided to wildland fire personnel working on large scale incidents.

    Understanding the intersections between Athletic Training and Public Health and supporting both professions in collaborative efforts to improve the public health of the communities of physically active individuals.

  • The purpose of this presentation is to provide Safe Space Ally Training (SSAT) to our membership. This workshop will explore the concepts of heterosexism, homonegativity, and sociocultural environmental impacts on the LGBTQIA+ community. The program will review the health and healthcare disparities of LGBTQIA+ persons and prepare ATs to integrate best practices in providing equitable healthcare to LGBTQIA+ patients. The session will identify qualities of an ally and advocate of LGBTQIA+ persons for those working in the athletic training profession to create an environment of inclusivity and respect. Participants will explore the concept of biases and how those affect the care that we provide…

    Abstract:
    The purpose of this presentation is to provide Safe Space Ally Training (SSAT) to our membership. This workshop will explore the concepts of heterosexism, homonegativity, and sociocultural environmental impacts on the LGBTQIA+ community. The program will review the health and healthcare disparities of LGBTQIA+ persons and prepare ATs to integrate best practices in providing equitable healthcare to LGBTQIA+ patients. The session will identify qualities of an ally and advocate of LGBTQIA+ persons for those working in the athletic training profession to create an environment of inclusivity and respect. Participants will explore the concept of biases and how those affect the care that we provide. By identifying the intrinsic cultural differences and the health-care disparities of the LGBTQIA+ community, clinicians will be prepared to assess health-care disparities and recommend appropriate referrals to their patients. Using reflective activities, this presentation will provide the resources, education and critical thinking needed to prepare athletic trainers to work respectfully in diverse work environments, specifically as it relates to LGBTQIA+ healthcare professionals and patients. 

    Learning Objectives:

    • Define terminology related to the LGBTQIA+ community. 
    • Discover their own biases related to heterosexism and homonegativity. 
    • Describe the relationship between the social determinants of health and existing health and healthcare disparities experienced by members of the LGBTQIA+ community.   
    • Integrate the qualities of an ally and advocate to support members of the LGBTQIA+ community. 
    • Create an environment of inclusivity within their athletic training facility and/or classroom supporting members of the LGBTQIA+ community. 
    • Integrate best practices in providing equitable healthcare to LGBTQIA+ patients, including proper referrals, for this population. 
    • Explore NATA and internet resources to advocate for the LGBTQIA+ person. 

    Level:
    Advanced

    Domain(s):
    Domain 1: Risk Reduction Wellness and Health Literacy 
    Domain 2: Assessment Evaluation and Diagnosis 
    Domain 3: Critical Incident Management 
    Domain 4: Therapeutic Intervention 
    Domain 5: Health Care Administration and Professional Responsibility

    CEUs:
    2.0 Category A

    Keywords: ally, LGBTQIA+, DEIA, health disparities, advocate, equitable health care, safe space, TGD, gender identity, gender expression, inclusivity, 

    Jen Sturtevant, MBA, LAT, ATC

    Jen Sturtevant (she/her) serves as the Ambulatory Services Supervisor, which includes coordinating the outreach athletic training program, for Tufts Medicine at MelroseWakefield Hospital in the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts. Jen is the current chair of the NATA LGBTQ+ Advisory Committee, current District 1 chair on the NATA Foundation Board of Directors, member of the MIAA Sports Medicine Committee and co-chairs MelroseWakefield Hospital’s DEI and Employee Engagement & Wellness Committees. She has a passion for working towards creating an inclusive and equitable environment for patients, employees, student-athletes, and community members and has provided educational presentations on topics such as transgender & gender diverse care in the secondary school setting, inclusive leadership and social determinants of health.

    Meredith N. Decker, PhD, LAT, ATC, PES

    Meredith Decker (she/her) is a Clinical Associate Professor and Coordinator of Clinical Education in the Master of Science in Athletic Training Program at the University of Texas at Arlington. She received her BS in Athletic Training from California University of Pennsylvania, MS in Exercise Physiology from Kent State University, and PhD in Kinesiology from the University of Texas at Arlington. Prior to her tenure at UT-Arlington, she was an Athletic Training Resident at Texas Health Sports Medicine, where she worked in the rehabilitation clinic and with TCU Athletics. Meredith’s research activities involve ACL reconstruction and osteoarthritis, concussion outcomes and LGBTQIA+ population health. Meredith currently serves as the District 6 representative to the NATA LGBTQ+ Committee, where she works on social media, Town Hall, and Safe Space Ally Training efforts. She resides in Fort Worth, Texas with her wife Halee and their son Arlo.

    Sean Rogers, DAT, LAT, ATC

    Dr. Sean Rogers (he/him) is an Associate Professor and Coordinator of Clinical Education for the Master of Athletic Training program at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa. He earned a bachelor's degree at Washington State University in 2015 and his Doctorate in Athletic Training from Indiana State in 2017. With a passion for advocacy, he was founding member of the LGBTQ+ Advisory Committee to the National Athletic Trainers’ Association. Dr. Rogers focuses the majority of his teaching, research, and volunteerism on combating the health and health disparities faced by LGBTQIA+ patients and athletes. He has published numerous papers and presented at multiple conferences on topics related to social determinants of health, intersectionality, gender affirming care for transgender patients, and policy guidance for athletic administrators.

    Jodee Roberts, DAT, LAT, ATC

    Jodee Roberts (she/her) has been practicing as an Athletic Trainer and a full-time teacher in the secondary school setting for 11 years. In 2013, she graduated with her bachelor’s in athletic training from Eastern Washington University with her studies in MRSA on sports equipment. She earned her Doctorate in Athletic Training from Indiana State University in 2021, with her published research in the Health Literacy of Hispanic Collegiate Athletes. She currently works and lives in the Wenatchee Valley in Washington State with her wife, 8-year-old daughter, 4 dogs and 3 cats. She enjoys gardening on her acre of land right across the street from the Columbia River where she often sea-doos and paddleboards. Her passion in life is creating environments where all people can be "heard" and "seen."

Recommended Based on Your Interests:

  • Treatment strategies based on recent evidence and best practices will be demonstrated, allowing the attendee to effectively integrate the information into a post-operative rehabilitation program. The presenters will also share evidence to support the use of manual treatment techniques to address concomitant pathological conditions (joint mobility, spinal alignment, myofascial pain) associated with shoulder dysfunction.

    Abstract:
    Treatment strategies based on recent evidence and best practices will be demonstrated, allowing the attendee to effectively integrate the information into a post-operative rehabilitation program. The presenters will also share evidence to support the use of manual treatment techniques to address concomitant pathological conditions (joint mobility, spinal alignment, myofascial pain) associated with shoulder dysfunction.

    Objectives:

    • Participants will be able to based on the available evidence, develop a non-operative rehabilitation program for patients with SLAP lesions., 
    • Participants will be able to explain best practices for the clinical evaluation of athletes with a SLAP lesion., 
    • Participants will be able to interpret results of clinical and diagnostic testing, and explain the common surgical procedures utilized., 
    • Participants will be able to develop an appropriate post-operative rehabilitation program based upon the available evidence.

    Level:
    Essential

    Domains:
    Domain 2: Assessment Evaluation and Diagnosis
    Domain 4: Therapeutic Intervention

    CEUs:
    1.75 Category A

    Keywords: Superior labral anterior posterior, shoulder, rehabilitation, SLAP lesion, treatment

    James Onate, PhD, ATC, FNATA

    Dr. Jimmy Onate joined The Ohio State University in January 2010. He earned his PhD in Human Movement Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2002 with a focus in biomechanics and motor learning. He has been an academic research faculty member interested in all aspects of human movement relative to injury prevention and performance optimization since 2003. He currently serves as the director of the PhD program in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, chair of graduate studies in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, a co-director of Ohio State's Sports Medicine's Movement Analysis & Performance (MAP) research program, a research scholar for the National Federation of High School Sports Medicine Advisory Committee, and a research consultant to Naval Special Warfare groups based in Virginia Beach, VA.His main research focus lies in developing functional motion assessment research that bridges the gap across research to clinical systems to allow for evidence-based outcomes for aiding individuals to sustain optimal health and performance throughout their careers and lives.

    Research Focus

    The specific aims of his research are focused to answer specific issues related to lower extremity injury, in particular anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, pre-participation examinations and human performance optimization. Funding for his work has been provided through the National Institutes of Health, Office of Naval Research, United States Special Operations Command and Naval Special Warfare Development Group for evaluating lower extremity injury in collegiate athletes and the development of physical performance models in military soldiers. The interaction of these two areas initially seems distinct, yet his approach to the questions lies along the fundamental concept of creating a parsimonious screening approach for evaluating injury risk and performance enhancement for physically active individuals, utilizing the movement assessment information to develop an instructional feedback approach to enhance performance and prevent injury and to integrate these two approaches into an implementable scientific model-driven approach to aid physically active individuals throughout their careers and lifetime to optimize health and performance. Dr. Onate acts as a key component in building the bridges between exercise and performance areas relative to all aspects of personalized health care in the hopes of developing proactive integrative approaches for wellness-based medicine aimed at optimizing lifelong health and performance.

  • There are over 100 different physical examination tests described to evaluate the shoulder. Confusion exists with regard to not only the proper technique but the validity of commonly used tests. In today's fast paced environment evidence based accuracy and efficiency when examining athletes is very important. This presentation will review the proper technique and statistical validation, and relevance of the best tests based on current literature. The discussion will include a demonstration of an efficient sequence and algorithm incorporating all necessary tests to complete a thorough and comprehensive examination of the shoulder.

    Abstract:
    There are over 100 different physical examination tests described to evaluate the shoulder. Confusion exists with regard to not only the proper technique but the validity of commonly used tests. In today's fast paced environment evidence based accuracy and efficiency when examining athletes is very important. This presentation will review the proper technique and statistical validation, and relevance of the best tests based on current literature. The discussion will include a demonstration of an efficient sequence and algorithm incorporating all necessary tests to complete a thorough and comprehensive examination of the shoulder.

    Objectives:

    • Participants will be able to describe the history and proper indications for the most commonly used shoulder exam tests., 
    • Participants will be able to explain basic statistical terms (i.e., sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy) to describe the validity of physical exam tests., 
    • Participants will be able to describe the proper technique for performing shoulder exam tests.


    Level:

    Advanced

    Domains:

    Domain 2: Assessment Evaluation and Diagnosis

    CEUs:
    0.75 Category A

    Keywords: shoulder, examination, tests, diagnostic, pitching, throwing,

    Steve Jordan, MD

    Dr. Steve Jordan is a board certified, fellowship trained orthopaedic surgeon. Dr. Jordan earned his Medical Degree from Medical University of South Carolina. Dr. Jordan specializes in sports medicine; however, he takes a special interest in shoulder injuries, throwing injuries, ACL reconstruction, and Tommy John reconstruction. Dr. Jordan is the Team Physician for both Washington High School and Chipola College.

  • History of prior injury is the strongest risk factor for future lower extremity injury. In addition, a large portion of secondary injuries occur during the first 2-3 months following return to sport. Thus, there is a gap in determining when an individual is ready to safely return to sport following initial injury. Individuals who pass a comprehensive return to sport testing battery are at lower risk for subsequent injury once returning to sport. As such, the development and utilization of a comprehensive return-to-sport testing battery can help determine one´s readiness to safely return to sport. This presentation will discuss the key components of…

    This presentation is a replay from NATA 2019 in Las Vegas, offering a second chance to experience the event's valuable content and insights.


    Abstract:
    History of prior injury is the strongest risk factor for future lower extremity injury. In addition, a large portion of secondary injuries occur during the first 2-3 months following return to sport. Thus, there is a gap in determining when an individual is ready to safely return to sport following initial injury. Individuals who pass a comprehensive return to sport testing battery are at lower risk for subsequent injury once returning to sport. As such, the development and utilization of a comprehensive return-to-sport testing battery can help determine one´s readiness to safely return to sport. This presentation will discuss the key components of an evidence-based return to sport testing battery following lower extremity injuries.

    Objectives:

    • Participants will be able to describe the changes in injury rates following initial lower extremity injury and subsequent return to sport., 
    • Participants will be able to describe the known risk factors for secondary injury following initial lower extremity injury., 
    • Participants will be able to utilize validated return to sport testing that can determine an individual´s readiness to return to sport., 
    • Participants will be able to discuss the role of training load monitoring and management in the return to sport process following lower extremity injury.

    Level:
    Advanced

    Domains:
    Domain 1: Risk Reduction Wellness and Health Literacy, Domain 2: Assessment Evaluation and Diagnosis

    CEUs: 1.0 Category A

    Keywords: knee, injury, lower extremity, return to sport, ankle, leg, testing

    Darin Padua, PhD, ATC

    Darin A. Padua is the Associate Provost for Academic Operations of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As an academic leader, he works to listen, collaborate, and empower others to work as a team towards our shared mission, vision, and priorities.

    The Joseph Curtis Sloane Distinguished Professor of Exercise and Sport Science, Padua has been a member of UNC’s faculty since 2001. He teaches courses in biomechanics, human anatomy, and kinesiology with a focus on injury risk mitigation and optimizing human performance. Throughout his career, Padua has mentored fellow faculty, along with hundreds of graduate and undergraduate students. He served as chair in the Department of Exercise and Sport Science from 2013 to 2023.

    With more than 25 years of experience, Padua is an internationally recognized scholar and is the Co-Director of the Musculoskeletal Injury Prevention (MOTION) Science Institute. His research revolves around prevention of musculoskeletal injuries, such as ACL rupture, by studying the role of movement quality and biomechanics as injury risk factors and intervention targets. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed articles, and his work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association, and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. He

    He received the Young Investigator Award by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (2006) and was later awarded the O’Donoghue Sports Injury Research Award for the most outstanding sport injury related research paper by the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (2008). He attained Fellow status in the National Academy of Kinesiology, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association, and received the Most Distinguished Athletic Trainer Award. His career research achievements were recognized by the by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association with receipt of the Medal for Distinguished Research (2017).

    Padua earned a B.S. in athletic training from San Diego State University, M.A. in exercise and sport science/athletic training from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and PhD in sports medicine from the University of Virginia. Born and raised in Visalia, California, he lives with his wife Jody and three daughters in Durham, NC.

  • Knee pathologies are common complaints for athletes and active patients presenting to athletic trainers for assessment and intervention, and though often not as complex as other joints in the body (ie, shoulder or hip), can present significant diagnostic challenges when imaging techniques are not readily or immediately available. Common traumatic disorders of the knee include forces that impact the menisci, ligaments, bones, and associated joints (ie, patellofemoral, tibiofemoral), while overuse injuries involving the patellofemoral joint, surrounding tissues (ie, IT Band), patellar tendon and tibiofemoral joint can challenge the unsuspecting diagnostician, as well. Undiagnosed, or improperly diagnosed knee conditions can also lead to lifelong disability and/or profound decreases in…

    Abstract:
    Knee pathologies are common complaints for athletes and active patients presenting to athletic trainers for assessment and intervention, and though often not as complex as other joints in the body (ie, shoulder or hip), can present significant diagnostic challenges when imaging techniques are not readily or immediately available. Common traumatic disorders of the knee include forces that impact the menisci, ligaments, bones, and associated joints (ie, patellofemoral, tibiofemoral), while overuse injuries involving the patellofemoral joint, surrounding tissues (ie, IT Band), patellar tendon and tibiofemoral joint can challenge the unsuspecting diagnostician, as well. Undiagnosed, or improperly diagnosed knee conditions can also lead to lifelong disability and/or profound decreases in health-related quality of life and functional enjoyment. Unsuspecting or inexperienced clinicians in all branches of sports medicine, if not careful can naively rely on special test results in isolation, or upon medical imaging for a working or final diagnosis, which includes false positive and negative results, increases overall healthcare costs, and/or cause unnecessary delays in treatment or return to participation. Experts in medical research have confirmed that accurate diagnoses come from the history portion of the exam in over 80 to 90% of cases and that individual physical exam test results should be viewed with suspicion in isolation. The focus of this presentation is to present the athletic training profession a review of physical examination special tests for common knee injuries and conditions, while also introducing or reviewing the evidence behind each test's respective diagnostic accuracy. In so doing, an overview of diagnostic accuracy terms and principles will be presented, followed by available diagnostic accuracy dates for each test presented in order for clinicians to become more aware of the strengths and limitations of tests commonly used to help assess athletic injuries of the knee.

    Objectives:

    • Participants will be able to state the fundamental principles and terms associated with diagnostic accuracy of physical examination tests, including sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, positive and negative predictive values, and overall utility scores., 
    • Participants will be able to identify the most useful, evidence-based physical examination tests for assessing various conditions of the knee., 
    • Participants will be able to recognize and incorporate the best-evidence tests in times of acute and chronic assessment of common knee injuries., 
    • Participants will be able to apply use of pooled tests in order to more accurately assess various orthopedic conditions of the knee in athletes and active patients.

    Level:
    Advanced

    Domains:
    Domain 2: Assessment Evaluation and Diagnosis

    CEUs:
    1.25 Category A

    Keywords: knee, orthopedic, menisci, ligaments, bones, joints, patellofemoral, tibiofemoral

    Paul Geisler, EdD, AT Ret.

    Associate Dean Geisler is a native of Lakeville, MA and current resident of Boston, MA. A certified athletic trainer since 1987 with over 15 years of varied clinical practice and 23 years' experience directing athletic training education programs at Georgia Southern University and Ithaca College. He is deeply interested in the development and assessment of the medico-clinical thinking processes of novice and experienced clinicians, the development of adaptive expertise in clinicians, progressive curriculum design, capability-based education, and meaningful programmatic assessment. He has over 170 national and international presentations and publications on clinical and educational based subjects in athletic training and health professions education to his credit. He is a member of the European Board of Medical Assessors, and past member of the Association of Medical Education, Europe.

    As a scholar, he is the recipient of two manuscript awards from the Journal of Athletic Training and the Athletic Training Education Journal. For his many professional contributions, he has been the recipient of the NATA Athletic Training Service Award and NATA Most Distinguished Athletic Trainer Award. As an educator, he was awarded the NATA Executive Council on Education's Sayers "Bud" Miller Distinguished Educator Award in 2021 and has received two Dean's Awards for Excellence & Innovation in Teaching, a Dean's Excellence Award for Diversity and Inclusion in Teaching and Learning, and the all college Faculty Excellence Award, all from Ithaca College.

    He admits to being an enthusiastic but slow road cyclist, an amateur shutterbug of nature and wonder, an aspiring wine snob and amateur foodie, and an unabashed promoter of equal rights, freedom, justice, and authentic democracy for all living beings. Susan, his life partner and wife of 34 years and he are fulfilled parents of two amazing young men – Nicholas, a writer living in Los Angeles, CA and Benjamin, a photographer and artist living in Brooklyn, NY.



    Series Content Where I am Featured:
    Master Preceptor Level Two - Module Five

  • The focus of this presentation is to present the most current clinical recognition strategies for evaluating ankle sprains and linking these strategies to the identification of those who are at the highest risk for developing CAI.

    Abstract:
    The focus of this presentation is to present the most current clinical recognition strategies for evaluating ankle sprains and linking these strategies to the identification of those who are at the highest risk for developing CAI.

    Objectives:

    • Participants will be able to summarize the recommendations of the NATA Position Statement on the Conservative Management and Prevention of Ankle Sprains in Athletes within the context of Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis., 
    • Participants will be able to identify the most important evidence-based key features associated with lateral ankle sprain recognition., 
    • Participants will be able to incorporate the emerging evidence of patient- and clinician-oriented outcome measures for identifying those at risk for developing chronic ankle instability., 
    • Participants will be able to make use of the outcome measures discussed in the presentation, including the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure, the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool, the weight-bearing lunge test, the single limb balance test, and the star excursion balance test, within their clinical practice.


    Level:
    Advanced

    Domains:
    Domain 2: Assessment Evaluation and Diagnosis

    CEUs:
    1.0 Category A

    Keywords: ankle, sprain, instability, diagnosis, lateral ankle sprain, balance test

    Patrick McKeon, PhD, ATC, CSCS

    Dr. Patrick McKeon is a BOC certified athletic trainer who joined the Ithaca College Athletic Training faculty in 2013. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Athletic Training from Springfield College in Springfield, MA;  his Master of Science degree in Sports Health Care from the Arizona School of Health Sciences in Phoenix, AZ (now in Mesa, AZ); and his PhD in Sports Medicine at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. He has held several positions as a clinical athletic trainer including Pearl River High School, Canisius College, and Marist College in New York, as well as Phoenix College and Brophy College Preparatory in Arizona.


    SCHOLARLY/RESEARCH INTERESTS

    Dr. McKeon’s research focuses on functional alterations associated with lower extremity joint injury. He incorporates patient-, clinician-, and laboratory-oriented outcomes to evaluate these alterations due to injury. Dr. McKeon also seeks to develop a greater understanding of the restoration of function associated with rehabilitation.  He aims to provide insight into effective clinical interventions for the sports medicine clinician to improve functional outcomes and enhance prevention strategies for patients who suffer lower extremity injury.  


    EDUCATIONAL INTERESTS

    Dr. McKeon's educational focus centers on evidence-based practice concepts and clinical reasoning theory. Within the courses he teaches, Dr. McKeon strives to instill a strong foundation in the integration of internal and external evidence for enhancing decisions related to the recognition, rehabilitation, and prevention of injuries/illnesses associated with athletic training clinical practice.


    PERSONAL

    Dr. McKeon enjoys spending his free time with his family and friends seeking out great life experiences. His wife, Dr. Jennifer McKeon is the IC Athletic Training Program Director and a faculty member in the Department of Exercise Science and Athletic Training. They have two children (Bobby and Mallory) who are also proud to be Bombers!



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